5 Best 9mm Ammo: Home Defense, Practice & Hunting (2020)

| | ,

Winner
Best 9mm Ammo
Best Value
Best 9mm Ammo
Best 9mm Ammo
Best 9mm Ammo
Best 9mm Ammo
9mm Ammunition
American Eagle – Syntech 9mm Luger 150gr Total Synthetic Jacket Action Pistol Ammo
Remington – UMC Ammo 9mm Luger 115gr FMJ
Winchester – USA White Box Ammo 9mm Luger 115gr FMJ
Hornady – Critical Defense Ammo 9mm Luger 115gr FTX
CCI – Blazer Ammo 9mm Luger 115gr FMJ
Our Test Result
Test Result 9.9/10 Excellent August 2020
Test Result 9.8/10 Excellent August 2020
Test Result 9.7/10 Very Good August 2020
Test Result 9.7/10 Very Good August 2020
Test Result 9.6/10 Very Good August 2020
Value for Money
Performance
Pros
  • Very comforable to shoot
  • Lead-free
  • Great price performance ratio
  • Total Synthetic Jacket (TSJ) Projectile
  • Great price for 9mm Ammo
  • Great for competition & training
  • Non magnetic Lead core
  • 115 Grains weight
  • No Leading in Barrel
  • Softer recoil
  • Great value for the money
  • Full metal jacket for great shooting line
  • Silver Nickel Plating
  • Almost no Muzzle Flash
  • Great for concealed carry & Home Defense
  • Innovative FTX bullet style
  • Newest Production Ammo on Market
  • Solid Accuracy
  • Good price
  • Reloadable Brass Cases
Cons
  • None really
  • Very light bullets
  • Should only be used for practice
  • Stronger Recoil
  • None
Recommended by us
Check Price
-
-
-
-
-
Winner
Best 9mm Ammo
9mm Ammunition
American Eagle – Syntech 9mm Luger 150gr Total Synthetic Jacket Action Pistol Ammo
Our Test Result
Test Result 9.9/10 Excellent August 2020
Value for Money
Performance
Pros
  • Very comforable to shoot
  • Lead-free
  • Great price performance ratio
  • Total Synthetic Jacket (TSJ) Projectile
Cons
  • None really
Recommended by us
Check Price
-
Best Value
Best 9mm Ammo
9mm Ammunition
Remington – UMC Ammo 9mm Luger 115gr FMJ
Our Test Result
Test Result 9.8/10 Excellent August 2020
Value for Money
Performance
Pros
  • Great price for 9mm Ammo
  • Great for competition & training
  • Non magnetic Lead core
  • 115 Grains weight
Cons
  • Very light bullets
Recommended by us
Check Price
-
Best 9mm Ammo
9mm Ammunition
Winchester – USA White Box Ammo 9mm Luger 115gr FMJ
Our Test Result
Test Result 9.7/10 Very Good August 2020
Value for Money
Performance
Pros
  • No Leading in Barrel
  • Softer recoil
  • Great value for the money
  • Full metal jacket for great shooting line
Cons
  • Should only be used for practice
Recommended by us
Check Price
-
Best 9mm Ammo
9mm Ammunition
Hornady – Critical Defense Ammo 9mm Luger 115gr FTX
Our Test Result
Test Result 9.7/10 Very Good August 2020
Value for Money
Performance
Pros
  • Silver Nickel Plating
  • Almost no Muzzle Flash
  • Great for concealed carry & Home Defense
  • Innovative FTX bullet style
Cons
  • Stronger Recoil
Recommended by us
Check Price
-
Best 9mm Ammo
9mm Ammunition
CCI – Blazer Ammo 9mm Luger 115gr FMJ
Our Test Result
Test Result 9.6/10 Very Good August 2020
Value for Money
Performance
Pros
  • Newest Production Ammo on Market
  • Solid Accuracy
  • Good price
  • Reloadable Brass Cases
Cons
  • None
Recommended by us
Check Price
-

5 Best 9mm Ammo: Home Defense, Practice & Hunting

The Parabellum (the term comes from the of the German telegraph manufacturer) goes back to the turn of the 20th century, acted as a tool in both world wars and was even more of a European standard.

Although the formidable 9 mm military sidearms proved ineffective for regular civilian carrying, the ammunition nonetheless attracted considerable curiosity when it was standardized by NATO.

In recent years the 9 mm Parabellum has been virtually the world-standard pistol ammunition for LE departments.

In the midst of its official success, the usage of the 9 mm as a sporting or protective round has evolved alongside significantly.

How to choose the right 9 mm Ammunition

While purchasing a compact carry weapon (CCW) is fairly straightforward, selecting ammunition is a complicated task, particularly when you’re in the market for the right 9 mm self-defense ammo.

We already illustrated 9 mm ammo’s strongest attributes for self-defense, here is a simple concept to remember: good shot positioning and targeting the attacker’s critical regions are a must when using pistol caliber ammunition for self-defence.

9mm Ammo Penetration

A 9 mm bullet must reach adequate penetration to destroy the critical organs, avoid the bad guy and do no collateral harm.

According to the FBI, the ideal 9 mm self-defense round for sidearms would have penetration depths of minimum 12 inches to maximum 18 inches when shot in ballistic fluid of 10 percent.

Wound cavity of a 9mm

Another noteworthy characteristic of 9 mm ammunition is the capacity of a projectile to penetrate a target enlarge space and create as much of a wound cavity as practicable.

A form of projectile meant for expansion is typically a JHP, because the hole in the uncovered bullet can facilitate expansion until the bullet reaches the target, providing a wider area for wounding.

Retention of Weight

A stronger projectile penetrates walls faster, so if it stays in one piece, does further damage.

All well-made rounds of protection will display exceptional weight retention; i.e. the projectile will stay in one piece as it penetrates light or heavy fabric and passes through the soft tissue.

Which is best for 9 mm Ammo?

Best 9mm Ammo

Although others harbour well-founded concerns regarding the terminal efficacy of the 9 mm, in reality the advantages of the 9 mm Parabellum have been overwhelmingly functional over the last century.

The modest measurements allow the use of high-capacity, dual-column gun magazines.

It is precisely the velocity aspect that has driven many many police forces and sports shooters around the globe to favor the 9 mm.

Nevertheless, recent technical advances in the production of bullets and propellants led to the skyrocketing success of the 9 mm.

These days the 9 mm caliber has something of a renaissance because people are more interested than ever in concealed carrying purpose-built compact pistols designed for constant wear and reactive use.

Thanks to the strong ballistics, large range of self-defense weapons, lower recoil, and affordability, the 9 mm has become the most common concealed carry caliber in the world of personal defense.

But in a gunfight, the guy who wins is the one who can place well-aimed shots at the right time and we recognize that every handgun owner must have training and practice.

9 mm ammo is less costly compared with other high-powered handgun bullets, particularly when bought in bulk.

The same decreased expense often allows owners of firearms to do more in less time.

Nevertheless, you have to discern between the 9 mm ammunition meant for defense purposes and the practice ammo you will use for the range.

You may purchase FMJ ammunition cases or buckets of 500 or more rounds for training and even target practice, to lower the cost per shot.

On the other side, several analysts have supported for years the “bigger is stronger” principle of protective pistol bullets, but with new 9 mm ammunition technologies and accuracy, lighter and quicker 9 mm projectiles will compare with the slower and heavier.45 ACP in terms of wounding capability.

Ammo 101 – Explaining the Types of Bullets

You usually have the following types of bullets on the market: lead unjacketed bullets, FMJ or full-metal-jacket bullets, and finally, the JHP or hollow-point bullets.

Since most major manufacturers of handguns prohibit the use of lead bullets in their firearm, the remaining two are most commonly found in our arsenals.

FMJ (Full Jacket)

A number of criminal histories and critical testing have demonstrated that complete metal jacket ammunition manages tremendous overpenetration and limited expansion, rendering this form less desirable for self protection.

It allows the round to go carry on clean through the body or target.

Best 9mm Ammo

JHP (Jacketed Hollow Point)

The new, bonded hollow point 9 mm jacketed bullets, on the other side, are superior to complete metal jacket projectiles, offering the minimum efficiency requirements we are seeking for self-defense.

Hollow point ammo with new projectile templates such as JHPs is designed to expand on soft tissue impacts to efficiently halt the intruder.

Today, several older projectile designs have emerged from the “fourth generation bullets,” such as the infamous Cor-Bon Glaser Safety Shot, which has an outstanding reputation when it comes to power stoppage.

Statistically, 87 % of people fired with 9 mm FMJ bullets recover, but more than 90 % of people armed with Glaser projectiles have died to date.

In reality, a individual shot in the front, mid-abdomen with a Glaser slug has an average survival period of about three days.

While they come with benefits such as the reduced chance of ricocheting or overpenetration, any sort of angled protection, such as glass window or indoor soft-wood screen, totally defeats the Glaser Safety Slugs.

Lehigh Defense Xtreme Penetrator ammunition and the Novx Severe Self-Defense weapons are better examples of enhanced and modern prototypes.

Both provide deep penetration because they are lighter than a typical 9 mm bullet, while these projectiles create a permanent wound cavity diameter that far exceeds the wound channels made by most expanding bullets.

Best 9 mm Ammunition – Our Review

In the next segment, we will introduce you to some of the best 9 mm ammunition options on the market that you can get.

Now, what you need to do is study the terminal ballistic output of your load in order to find a good load for your 9mm gun.

Best 9mm Ammo: American Eagle – Syntech 9mm Luger 150gr Total Synthetic Jacket Action Pistol Ammo

Best 9mm Ammo

Pros

  • Very comforable to shoot
  • Lead-free
  • Great price performance ratio
  • Total Synthetic Jacket (TSJ) Projectile

Cons

  • None really

Best 9mm Ammo

The first place on our list of Best 9mm Ammo is a load coming from Federal Ammunition, which has been manufacturing ammo for about a century.

A latest gun “range” round with the proprietary complete synthetic jacket (TSJ) has been launched on the market through their sub-brand, American Eagle, which decreases heat and friction.

Topped with 150-grain, powerful, flat-nose bullets this ammunition is designed in combat shooting sports to fulfill the power factor requirements.

This AE soft load achieves an 875 ft / s muzzle velocity and a 255 ft-lb muzzle capacity.

Although Syntech loads in competition have consistent knockdowns on steel targets, they also minimize splash back on steel targets, accompanied by a notable reduction in perceived recoil over normal FMJ loads.

The American Eagle exclusive polymer coating ensures that a dense, robust, red polymer sheet entirely covers the lead-alloy heart, ensuring that no heavy metal is visible.

This latest ammo is mounted in brass cases and supplied with the current boxer-type lead-free Catalyst primers.

Syntech jackets allow the bullets to flow through the muzzle, preventing fouling of copper and lead and keeping your arms cleaner.

Given the very soft firing of the Syntech Action Pistol ammunition, there are several concerns that it does not work in heavy weapons without moving to lighter springs for the recoil.

Verdict: Best 9mm Ammo

Although self-defense ammo seems to be all the rage these days, the American Eagle Syntech Action Pistol ammunition series is built as a practice-type weapon for a long day at the range and large volume competition shooting.

2nd Best 9mm Ammo: Remington – UMC Ammo 9mm Luger 115gr FMJ

Best 9mm Ammo

Pros

  • Great price for 9mm Ammo
  • Great for competition & training
  • Non magnetic Lead core
  • 115 Grains weight

Cons

  • Very light bullets

2nd Best 9mm Ammo

The famous and revered American ammo manufacturer is recognized for its creativity in architecture and quality in production.

Of course it’s Remington Arms and their line of ammo unified metal cartridge (UMC), a perfect option for training, target shooting, or shooting exercises.

The Remington UMC 9 mm Luger is a recent development ammo which is an outstanding combination of reliability and efficiency, featuring a non-corrosive boxer primer and brand new brass enclosures for those amateurs who want to reload their 9 mm ammo.

This Remington 9 mm Luger ammunition is filled with non-magnetic, 115gr metal case (MC) projectiles, the word for a regular, lead frame, full metal jacket projectile by Remington.

The 115gr ammunition charge hits 1.135 ft / s and produces 328 ft / lbs of muzzle energy.

The UMC pistol ammunition line gives the high-volume shooter moderately priced rounds, allowing aiming and practice shooting a more fun and quite inexpensive operation.

With these low-priced ammunition, however, you may anticipate certain quality assurance inspection deficiencies expressed in a limited percentage of fail-to-function (FTF) failures.

Verdict: 2nd Best 9mm Ammo

The UMC 9 mm offers standard American-made and economic “go-to” weapon ammunition designed for plinking, military exercise, action-pistol shooting, or other form of target shooting.

3rd Best 9mm Ammo: Winchester – USA White Box Ammo 9mm Luger 115gr FMJ

Best 9mm Ammo

Pros

  • No Leading in Barrel
  • Softer recoil
  • Great value for the money
  • Full metal jacket for great shooting line

Cons

  • Should only be used for practice

3rd Best 9mm Ammunition

Also our next recommendation comes from one of the famous US ammunition makers and is sold as the “USA White Box” collection of Winchester.

Owing to good precision and constructive working of full metal jacket projectile, the USA White Box 9×19 mm calibre ammunition has a default program for plinking and targeting.

The 115-grain projectile is filled with quick and clean burning powder and mounted in the brass shell.

For a muzzle strength of 362 ft-lb it hits 1.190 ft / s.

Although this ammunition with fabricator code Q4172 is a good option for practice and plinking, tournaments are less easy.

It is attributed to minor feeding or extraction complications in certain weapons however the amount of FTF or FTE’s is small even the most casual targets.

Although this ammo has a little more smack than typical target / plinking rounds, occasional and intermittent FTF issues can allow you the chance to practice clearing a halt, allowing this ammo variety more close to actual self-defense weapons.

For reloaders, the brass cases are pretty good news and even if you happen to be firing at certain ranges that don’t require you to pick up your brass casings.

Verdict: 3rd Best 9mm Ammunition

Since a long time, Winchester has been producing White Box ammunition, helping millions of newbies to become competent and professional shooters without breaking the bank for more costly 9 mm Luger projectiles.

4th Best 9mm Ammo: Hornady – Critical Defense Ammo 9mm Luger 115gr FTX

Best 9mm Ammo

Pros

  • Silver Nickel Plating
  • Almost no Muzzle Flash
  • Great for concealed carry & Home Defense
  • Innovative FTX bullet style

Cons

  • Stronger Recoil

4th Best 9mm Ammunition

Using a particular method to current self-defense weapons, Hornady has created a new range of weapons named “Critical” focused on their ammo LeveRevolution designed for lever-action rifles.

First, please do not equate Critical Duty with Critical Defense Munitions, because they are separate styles intended to meet somewhat specific needs.

Hornady ‘s Critical Defense Munition is identical to a conventional hollow point jacket (JHP) projectile except with an additional rubber tip within the hollow spot.

Designated as the eXpanding Flex Tip (FTX) projectile, this load offers flat trajectories and improves feed as well as output.

In this way the Flex Tip architecture of Hornady FTX allows adequate penetration and regulated expansion between 1.3 and 1.6 times the original diameter of the 9 mm.

Although both Critical Defense bullets with adjustable tips are helpful in stopping hollow points from becoming clogged, they are often cannelled and case-crimped to avoid bullet setback.

While Hornady loads its Vital series of clean-burning and durable propellants to launch the 115-grain bullet at a pace of 1,140 fps and 332 ft.-lb.

This also has a bit of muzzle energy and an extreme yet acceptable recoil.

Verdict: 4th Best 9mm Ammunition

Unlike Critical Duty Ammunition, the Critical Defense configuration was not meant to follow the complete FBI protocol; rather, it was built for protective conditions where there was no intermediate limit.

In addition, Vital Protection is equipped to be shot from short-barreled, lightweight bearing arms.

5th Best 9mm Ammo: CCI – Blazer Ammo 9mm Luger 115gr FMJ

Best 9mm Ammo

Pros

  • Newest Production Ammo on Market
  • Solid Accuracy
  • Good price
  • Reloadable Brass Cases

Cons

  • None

5th Best 9mm Ammo

The 9 mm Blazer Brass ammo manufactured by CCI is meant as a safe training and practicing weapon for the casual shooters to use.

With a muzzle velocity of 1,125 fps and 323 ft.-lbs. muzzle capacity, CCI Blazer Brass 9 mm Luger is a perfect ammunition for gaming, target shooting and fitness drills because it blends cost-effective packaging with quality CCI primers and safe shot FMJ covered foundation bullets.

The Blazer 9 mm is mounted in brass enclosures and has an FMJ-RN (full metal copper plated jacket-round nose), 115-grain projectile on top.

Since of its extraordinarily good consistency the virgin brass can be reloaded up to five times.

There are several drawbacks of use the Blazer Brass Ammo in indoor ranges owing of jacket isolation issues.

It’s also a explanation why the Blazer Brass ammunition isn’t intended for law enforcement use.

On the other side the 9 mm Luger by CCI is the perfect option for bulk 9 mm target shooting ammunition from an economic point of view.

Verdict: 5th Best 9mm Ammo

Although there are several downsides about this CCI Blazer Brass, low-cost ammunition, it’s very suitable for target shooting or just plinking about at the range, as well as for reloaders.

CCI offers ammo shooters designed to SAAMI specifications, capable of expanding shooting sessions without a large price tag or organizational issues.

Concluding

If it’s for defending yourself and everyone you care for or even for fun plinking, you shouldn’t ignore that a completely loaded gun, except with some of the finest ammunition on the market, won’t accomplish the target alone, but achievement can come from the skill, correct attitude, and marksmanship, combined with your choice of high-quality ammunition.

Everyone aiming for the best standard of efficiency for self-defense 9 mm weapons would be using widening and fragmenting weapons such as hollow-point bullets, without doubt.

Best 9mm Ammo

There are several different styles and brands of 9 mm JHP cartridges which give a remarkable improvement in stopping power, achieved by using the energy of the bullet as efficiently as possible.

Additionally, although the regulated expansion of the jacket into “flower petals” produces a greater diameter of the bullet in the target, sufficient expansion must often avoid overpenetration and mitigate collateral harm from bullets going through the goal.

We wish that you never have to use your weapon in self-defense, but like any responsible person, by following the knowledge gathered and evaluating your budget for getting the right security ammunition, as well as for preparation and practice, you can brace yourself for the worst case.

What our Readers ask about the Best 9mm Ammo?

The calibre wars have been going on for decades between the 9 mm Luger and many other high-powered weapon cartridges.

None of them, however, has the winning combination of strength, durability, and economics demonstrated by the 9 mm Luger; thus the 9mm wins the contest for notoriety.

While the 9 mm Parabellum has long been a commonly popular round, this favored round also poses numerous misinterpretations and misunderstandings.

What is the disparity of the Luger Ammunition 9 mm and regular 9 mm?

You may find different names for the same cartridge in the previous chapters.

The gun is called 9×19 mm by accepted nomenclature, but, we often name it “9 mm,” “9 mm Parabellum,” “9 mm NATO” or “9 mm Luger,” but all of these apply to the same 9×19 mm gun.

These are separate terms for the same ammunition but you should be conscious of hundreds of other cartridges in the same caliber (9X18 Makarov,9 mm Kurtz,9×21 IMI) which are not actually compatible with the most popular cartridges of handguns.

What is the difference between 9 mm Ammunition with 115 Grain and 124 Grain?

We don’t believe the varying weight of the projectile creates a lot of difference if you can hold the groups relatively close.

Loads of lighter bullets can have a marginally less perceived recoil and higher velocities than heavier bullets, but the variations are marginal because the projectile weights are almost identical.

On the other side, it’s true that projectile weight counts very little a lot of the time, so when we think about self-defense and shooting, our recommendation is to search for ballistics gelatin testing or real-world accuracy records with a particular weapon.

Ammunition that’s Steel-Cased Bad For 9 mm?

Best 9mm Ammo

Next, don’t mess with the steel cases if you’re a reloading, since they’re more hassle than they’re worth.

Second, the steel-cased ammunition is meant as an inexpensive substitute for standard brass offerings.

Furthermore, the heavy steel shell casing, which is tougher than brass, produces more wear and tear on the firearm and there might be further corrosion difficulties but only in straight-walled situations.

As we learn, a somewhat tapered case includes 9×19 mm and would be less susceptible to tougher extraction.

As the steel-cased ammunition is much cheaper than the equivalent brass-case bullets, it is recommended that it be used for testing and preparation.

Where to put your Best 9mm Ammo for Storage?

The basic rule for storing ammunition is to store it in a safe, secure, dark spot.

Although most of you’ll talk of weapons safes first, it shouldn’t be the only place to store ammunition.

The primary explanation is that the day-to-day temperature fluctuations will trigger moisture, which is the true danger to the ammunition.

One way to prevent elevated moisture is purchasing desiccant canisters or using a decent dehumidifier.

Pack the ammunition in rubber gasket military model 30 and 50-caliber ammunition bottles is another way to handle the elevated humidity.

The organisation and structure are good concepts for effective ammunition handling, suggesting you can mark your ammunition containers.

The modern ammo can last centuries if you place the ammunition in virtually perfect conditions.

Instead depletion occurs on day one if you store the ammunition improperly.

IN PRACTICAL TEST: HOLLOW-POINTED AMMUNITION CALIBER 9MM LUGER

After the revolver cartridges .38 Special and .357 Magnum in the September and October editions, the widely used pistol ammunition in the 9mm Luger caliber is now under scrutiny.

The caliber 9mm Luger is widely used as a military and police cartridge worldwide, and civilian gun carriers also appreciate the effective and pleasant to shoot cartridge.

The 9mm Luger was already developed in 1902 by DWM in cooperation with Georg Luger.

Best 9mm Ammo

It was the standard cartridge in two world wars, then established itself as NATO ammunition and in 1986 even replaced the .45 ACP in the US Army.

Many police forces worldwide also carry weapons in this caliber.

Although the military full metal jacket ammunition has a high penetrating power, it has little stopping effect.

For this reason, rapidly deforming projectiles were developed at a very early stage for this cartridge in the civilian sector and, where permitted, were also used.

Until now, US hunters have had only simple partially jacketed projectiles and Lapua CEPP available as interceptor ammunition.

The 9mm Luger pistols, despite their many other advantages, very compact and safe to use models are available, not very popular among US hunters when it comes to catching big game.

The simple partial jacket bullets deformed in the speed range of the 9mm Luger, if they had a lead core exposed far enough, but were not very reliable and caused feed disturbances in many weapon models.

Only the CEPP worked reliably and showed good results.

However, now the hunter has a wide range of special ammunition available, which should considerably improve the effectiveness of a 9mm Luger pistol.

Ten laboratories were selected for the test and extensively tested. The test program largely corresponded to the procedure already presented for the two revolver cartridges, except that functional tests were additionally carried out with three different weapon models, because functional reliability is a very important test criterion for a pistol cartridge.

A Glock Model 26, an FN High Power and a Firestar were used for the functional tests.

The gelatin bombardment was carried out with the compact Glock 26, which has a barrel length of 88 millimetres.

Lapua CEPP Extra 120 Grains

Best 9mm Ammo

CEPP stands for Controlled Expanding Police Projectil and shows that this bullet was developed for police use.

The normal CEPP was already allowed and was first choice for many users of 9mm Luger pistols.

But now the CEPP Extra is also permitted, which ensures an even faster energy release.

The bullet jacket of the CEPP is very thin and the lead filling is soft. Especially at the bullet tip, the jacket has been made just thick enough to prevent deformation during feeding inside the pistol.

The bullet structure with a light hollow point, thin jacket and soft lead filling shows that a bullet has been constructed here whose main task is a good energy release in the target by deformation.

The CEPP Extra also has predetermined breaking points in the front part of the bullet, which are intended to accelerate this process.

The function was flawless in the self-loading pistols.

This was to be expected, because the normal CEPP is known for its very good weapon compatibility and the Extra has the same outer shape.

With a muzzle velocity of 371 m/s from the 88 millimetre barrel of the Glock, the CEPP Extra is fast and shot an excellent 26 millimetre scattering circle at ten metres.

Here 5.2 grains of fine rod powder are loaded.

The CEPP responds quickly, but also loses mass.

After the bone had been penetrated, the diameter of the bullet residue was only 10.2 millimeters.

The front mantle part and part of the lead core had dissolved into splinters.

However, the depth effect is quite high because the relatively small diameter of the bullet is slowed down much less than when a large-area fungus is formed.

However, the wound canal is correspondingly smaller. However, the CEPP Extra cannot keep up with modern deformation bullets, which hardly lose any mass.

Spear Gold Dot 115 Grains

Best 9mm Ammo

The Gold Dot from Speer is a composite core bullet and is designed to achieve a great depth effect due to the low loss of mass.

During production, Speer first electrolytically applies the copper jacket to the lead core and then presses the bullet into its final shape.

This makes it impossible to separate the jacket from the core.

Due to the bullet shape without protruding lead at the tip, the Gold Dot worked very well in the three test weapons, only the High Power produced two disturbances.

However, here it was obviously the fast cartridge and not the bullet shape that was to blame.

The Glock and Firestar had no problems.

The precision from the short Glock 26 was sufficient with 39 millimetres at ten metres, and it was noticeable that the Gold Dot produced very little muzzle flash.

The 5.2 grains of fine flake powder obviously burn off quickly and cleanly and develop their energy even in short barrels.

This is also shown by the high muzzle velocity of 388 m/s.

The light bullet responds immediately in the gelatin block and quickly increases its diameter.

It was perfectly sufficient to penetrate the bone, but then ten centimetres further on was the end.

The bullet had a diameter of 14.5 millimetres and a perfect mushroom shape.

It was a good cartridge, which only needed to be a little more deep.

Spear Gold Dot 124 Grains

Slightly more bullet weight, but with 372 m/s only a slightly lower velocity.

The 124 Grains Laboratory with 4.8 Grains leaf powder is obviously of the same type.

The precision was excellent with 21 millimetres. Again there was very little muzzle flash.

The recoil behaviour hardly differs from the lighter cartridge, and the function was trouble-free in all three test weapons.

Best 9mm Ammo

The 124 Grains bullet responds almost as quickly as the lighter Gold Dot due to the high Vo, but has more depth effect due to the greater mass.

The bullet even mushroomed up to 17.0 millimetres, penetrated the bone and penetrated far into the gelatine block.

The diameter of the bullet remnant was even larger than that of the light 115 Grains bullet.

With the light bullet, the jacket vanes are obviously pressed tightly against the bullet body again due to the higher velocity, resulting in a smaller diameter.

The 124 Grains Gold Dot is a very good cartridge for a muzzle loading pistol.

Spear Gold Dot 147 Grains

It’s the same bullet, just with more weight. The powder charge is slightly lower at 4.4 grains, and from the 88 millimetre barrel of the Glock came the 147-Grainer at 330 m/s.

The scattering circle at ten metres measured 28 millimetres, and here again there was hardly any muzzle flash.

However, the recoil of the heavier projectile is much stronger.

None of the three test weapons malfunctioned.

The 147 Grains Gold Dot responds a little more restrained than the lighter Laboratoriums, but this was to be expected with the much lower muzzle velocity.

The bullet mushroom had a diameter of 16.0 millimetres and showed hardly any loss of mass.

In depth effect, the 147 Grains bullet is the same as the lighter 124 Grains Gold Dot.

The 124 Grains Gold Dot bullet is therefore the best choice for catching shots, because in this bullet weight the bullet responds much faster without losing depth effect and shoots more comfortably.

Sellier&Bellot HP 115 Grains

Sellier&Bellot loads a classic hollow point bullet with additional jacket notches in the bullet tip area.

The tombac jacket is extended to the tip and no lead is exposed.

The hole in the bullet head is quite small.

Best 9mm Ammo

The powder charge is 4.8 grains of very fine flake powder.

The muzzle flash is clearly visible.

The precision is okay with 32 millimetres from the Glock.

The Firestar produced with the S&B three disturbances with ten shots, the other weapons worked without problems.

The muzzle velocity was measured at 358 m/s.

The bullet quickly mushroomed up when entering the target medium, but also lost mass.

The bone was punctured, but shortly after that the 19.0 millimetre diameter bullet residue got stuck.

For heavier game, the depth effect is somewhat too shallow.

The Sellier & Bellot cartridge is very inexpensive for this, and the simple hollow-point bullet works surprisingly well.

PMC Star Fire 124 Grains

The Star Fire bullet from PMC has five ribs and floods pressed into the lead of the hollow point, which are intended to ensure that the bullet mushrooms up to twice the bullet diameter.

PMC loads 5.2 grains of fine flake powder, which accelerate the projectile from the test weapon to a remarkable 361 m/s.

All three weapons in the test fired the Star Fire without incident and the muzzle flash was limited.

The precision from the Glock was good at 27 millimetres at 10 metres.

The Star Fire responds very quickly and mushroomed up to 21 millimetres.

It produced the largest bullet diameter in the test.

The bone was punctured and splintered very badly.

The depth effect is correspondingly small with this strong mushrooming.

A great bullet for defence purposes, which should provide the best stopping power.

However, the depth effect is too small for catching heavy game.

Winchester SXT 147 Grains

SXT stands for Supreme Expansion Technology.

Like Remington with the Golden Saber, which scored very well in the test of the .357 Magnum cartridges, Winchester relies on a harder brass jacket with SXT for the controlled control of the mushrooming process.

The pre-scored bullet tip is designed to ensure that the jacket rolls up in precisely defined flags.

The bullet is coated black to reduce abrasion in the barrel.

Best 9mm Ammo

The powder charge consists of 4.5 grains of flake powder. The SXT left the short barrel of the Glock at 332 m/s.

The recoil is heavy, but there is hardly any muzzle flash.

All three weapons fired with the SXT without any problems.

With 26 millimeters the Winchester laboratory shows a good precision.

The penetration depth into the gelatine block is astonishingly high even after the bone has been penetrated – even though the SXT very quickly mushroomed up to 17.2 millimetres.

However, it hardly lost any mass.

Compared to the other 147 grains laboratory in the test, the Gold Dot, the SXT is clearly superior.

A very good catching shot cartridge for heavy hoofed game, which responds reliably even with soft hits and light game.

Hornady XTP 115 Grains

The XTP is already a good old acquaintance from the tests of the revolver cartridges .38 Special and .357 Magnum.

Hornady is also represented with two laboratories for the 9mm Luger.

The XTP has a very large hollow point and a thin jacket in the front part, which reaches to the bullet tip.

The hardness of the lead core is adjusted to the muzzle velocity of the cartridge.

The aim is to ensure that the thin front part of the jacket quickly mushrooms up and the mushrooming-up process decreases with increasing jacket thickness.

The 115 Grains Laboratory is very fast at 382 m/s from the short-range Glock.

The high Vo is achieved by 5.0 grains of leaf powder, which also produce a clearly visible, bright muzzle flash.

With the 115 Grains cartridge, the High Power again showed the typical disturbances that also occurred with the 115 Grains Gold Dot from Speer.

Obviously this model does not cope so well with the light, fast bullets.

With the other two pistols no weapon interference occurred.

The precision from the Glock is not very high at 32 millimetres, but it is perfectly adequate for catch-fire purposes.

The fast bullet mushrooms up quickly and loses some of its mass.

The depth effect is comparable to the Gold Dot.

The bullet remnant had a diameter of 15.3 millimetres after the bone penetration and got stuck directly after the blade.

A little more depth effect would be desirable here as well.

Hornady XTP 124 Grains

Best 9mm Ammo

The somewhat heavier XTP came to a muzzle velocity of 371 m/s, whereby here with 5.2 grains even a higher powder charge is used than with the lighter XTP. The muzzle flash is just as bright as the 115 Grains bullet, the recoil is a bit stronger.

The precision is much better with 21 millimetres and the 124 Grains cartridge worked trouble-free in all three weapons.

As expected, the slightly heavier bullet has a better depth effect.

The bullet diameter of 15.2 millimetres was almost identical to the light Hornady Laboratory bullet.

As with the Speer Gold Dot, the 124 grains of Hornady’s XTP is the most favourable bullet weight for catch-fire purposes.

The modern deformation bullets hardly lose any mass and have a better depth effect when there is a little more bullet weight.

Federal Expanding Full Metal Jacket 124 Grains

The Federal EFMJ is a bullet development that does not have a hollow point.

This bullet has a pressurised rubber insert under the bullet tip which is responsible for deformation – and it works perfectly.

The EFMJ was developed for the government market, and they wanted a deformation bullet without a hollow point.

During a police operation in New York, several innocent people died because the Federal Hydra Shoc hollow-point 9mm Luger bullets used had clogged up when penetrating clothing and penetrated like full metal jacket bullets.

This cannot happen with the EFMJ.

The Federal cartridge is a +P laboratory and reaches 381 m/s from the barrel of the Glock.

This makes it the fastest cartridge of the 124 Grains Laboratories and the most energy-rich cartridge in the test.

This is achieved with 5.0 Grains leaf powder.

The muzzle flash is very bright.

All weapons shot with the Federal cartridge without any problems.

The precision was excellent with 22 millimetres.

The recoil is violent from the light Glock.

The Expanding Full Metal Jacket worked like a textbook in the gelatin block. It mushroomed up to 16.4 millimetres without loss of mass, penetrated the cast-in bone and got stuck just before the end of the block.

The bullet was so well preserved that even the “F” on the tip of the bullet was still legible in the middle of the bullet’s mushroom.

An excellent cartridge for catch-fire purposes, which works reliably and has good depth penetration.

Findings from the test: Best 9mm Ammo

Best 9mm Ammo

First of all, the 9mm Luger, fired from a compact pistol, has proven to be superior to a .38 pocket revolver in terms of effectiveness, but is far from being as effective as a .357 Magnum.

The achievable muzzle velocity of the 9mm pistol cartridge is sufficient to reliably mushroom up all bullet types.

The manufacturers are pretty much in agreement on the laboratory testing of the 9mm Luger, as can be seen from the almost identical powder charges and measured muzzle velocities.

With the .357 Magnum this was much more different. The light 115 Grains bullets clearly have too little depth effect for heavy game.

They partially decompose and lose mass.

The bullet weight of 124 Grains seems to be optimal. Here the ratio of fast energy release and good depth penetration is very good when using bullets like the Hornady XTP, Speer Gold Dot or the Federal EFMJ.

The S&B cartridge and the PMC Star Fire are too much designed for fast energy release.

Lapua CEPP Extra loses too much mass. For the 147 Grains bullets, the best choice is the Winchester SXT, which can easily keep up with the 124 Grains bullets.

In the 9 mm Luger caliber, modern hollow point bullets are a real advantage for the hunter and far superior to the partial jacketed bullets allowed so far.

But even with this effective ammunition, a 9 mm pistol will by no means become a safe “Saustopper”.

This should be kept in mind by everyone who carries this caliber on searches.

In any case, the safe function of the gun should be tested on the shooting range before it is used in the shooting range.

The “hottest” cartridge is of little use if the gun jams after the first shot.

Leave a Comment